April 17, 2012

Thank you,  Janet Wong, for being today’s guest poetry poster, especially since I messed up the post originally! Now, finally, the correct post from Janet!   One year ago Sylvia Vardell and I launched our PoetryTagTime series of original poetry e-books. Why e-books? We wanted to make poetry affordable—less than a cup of coffee and…

April 16, 2012

Thank you, Ed DeCaria of Think Kid, Think!  for being today’s guest poetry poster! Find TKT on Facebook Follow Ed on Twitter This past March, the kids’ poetry world went completely mad. I’m here to confess: It was all my fault. It started so innocently. I was new to the scene, and just wanted to…

April 13, 2012

Thank you,  Laura Purdie Salas for being today’s guest poetry poster! Follow Laura on Facebook here I love poetry! I’ve published more than 100 books, mostly nonfiction, but if I could build a career just out of poetry, I would! I love to write poems, connect kids with poems, share poems with people, get teachers…

April 12, 2012

Today’s guest poetry poster is Sylvia Vardell, whose blog is Poetry for Children Find Sylvia on Facebook   Test your Poetry IQ Sylvia says since April is National Poetry Month it’s the perfect time to test what you know about poetry! No cheating by scrolling down to check the answers! See how you do on…

April 10, 2012

She’s been called America’s Hans Christian Andersen, but why not call her America’s Jane Yolen?! I’m happy to welcome today’s guest poetry poster, Jane Yolen!   Five Tips On Writing A Poem 1. Look at the world through metaphor, seeing one tree in terms of another. 2. Let two words bump up against another Or…

April 9, 2012

Lee Wardlaw is my guest poet poster today. Follow Lee on Facebook   Your tummy, soft as warm dough. I knead and knead, then bake it with a nap.   Haiku is… pronounced HI-koo a non-rhyming form of poetry that originated in Japan during the 9th century the shortest form of poetry in the world!…

April 8, 2012

Today’s guest poetry poster is Bobbi Katz!   No time? Write bad haiku! If you’re in a hurry, there’s nothing faster than writing a bad haiku. Three lines, 17 syllables: What could be easier? The trick is to use the word “nice” in two or more lines! Oh, yes, remember that traditional haiku focus on…